banner holder

Jetty Dives

South Australia’s large coastline has well over 20 diveable jetties and many easily accessible shore dives spanning our metropolitan and regional areas. Some of these shallow dives are abundant in unique marine life and suitable for all levels of diver. The sites are often accessed by jetties/piers with entry and exit from stairs, ladders or purpose built platforms.

You can join Adelaide Scuba on free Divemaster or Instructor led guided shore dives around SA, contact the store to find out how you can join our Dive Crew.


Glenelg Jetty
 
Location: Metro Coastline, 20 minutes West of the city.
 
Depth: 4-6 Metres
 
Rating: Open Water and above
 
With a long history and tragic losses to storms and high seas, the jetty has become a fabulous dive site and with the remains of previous jetties laying on the sea floor it has become a home to many species of marine life. The Glenelg Jetty is known for its macro life, a usual dive consists of many nudibranch sightings, pygmy leatherjackets, octopus, cuttlefish, various crabs, shrimps and bleni’s hiding amongst the broken limestone bottom. With a max depth of 6 metres this site provides long bottom times and plenty of natural light when the sun is out. An easy shore dive and or combo boat dive with a visit to the Glenelg Blocks is a must do. As one of Adelaide Scuba’s house reefs we monitor, maintain and dive the site regularly. It is important to check the tides and dive it close to the high for an easier entry and shorter beach walk to the water.

Port Noarlunga Jetty (Aquatic Reserve)
 
Location: Metro Coastline, 40 Minutes South of the City Centre.
 
Depth: 6-18 Metres
 
Rating: Open Water
 
South Australia’s most popular shore dive site, Port Noarlunga is an exceptional dive. The reef is a natural rocky breakwater which travels approximately 800 metres parallel to the shoreline. A large carpark & seating area gives plenty of space for divers, the walk is approx 200 metres so for those with difficulty carrying gear a trolley is optional, access is via an established jetty with stairs leading directly to the water. With over 200 species of marine plants and animals, over 73 types of fish, bryozoans, sponges, hydroids, ascidians and molluscs, it is a great dive for both beginner and experienced divers. Caution should be taken as there is a strong current when high and low tides have a difference of more than one metre, it is very important to check tidal movement before planning the dive. The low tide protects the inner reef allowing for calm conditions, the outer reef can also be dived by crossing the reef carefully or exiting via a gap in the reef south of the jetty. The average depth of the reef is approximately 6-8 metres with a section of the gap reaching 18m at high tide.

Second Valley
 
Location: Fleurieu Peninsula, one hour south of Adelaide.
 
Depth: approx. 4-10 Metres
 
Rating: Open Water
 
Second Valley as a dive site has it all. Aside from the jetty, there are seagrass and kelp beds to immerse yourself in, a reef site just offshore known as lasers reef, a hidden sponge garden, drop offs, historical artefacts from the areas early days and wonderful caves and swim throughs to explore. There is also an array of amazing and diverse marine life including the world renowned Leafy Sea Dragon. With a carpark for gearing up the entry point is the beach and you can swim around the coastline area. Be cautious of fishing lines when diving as it is also a popular spot for recreational fishing.

Rapid Bay Jetty
 
Location: Fleuireu Peninsula, 1.5 hours south of Adelaide
 
Depth: 6-10 metres
 
Rating: Open Water
 
The famous Rapid Bay Jetty is one of South Australia’s premier shore diving sites consisting of two jetties, one old timber jetty with no land access and the other a newly built jetty. The jetty pylons and construction rubble has developed into a magnificent reef system hosting established marine life, expect to see large schools of fish in and around the old jetty structure. The Leafy Sea Dragon also makes its home amongst the weed, whilst they are not seasonal they can be difficult to locate, fin carefully and avoid damaging their fragile environment when diving.
Enter from the purpose built dive platform of the newer jetty and swim over to the old jetty just 20 or so metres away. The old jetty is 470 metres long with a 200m t-section. Definitely a site worth spending considerable underwater time on. 

The Bluff, Victor Harbor
 
Location: Fleurieu Peninsula, 1 hour south of Adelaide
 
Depth: 4-40 meters
 
Rating: Open Water / Advanced / Deep
 
The Bluff is a fabulous dive in good conditions. Entry is from a small wharf on the eastern side of the Bluff. Leafy sea dragons are often seen here. There are also seals, seahorses, crayfish, nudibranchs, the occasional dolphin or seal plus lots and lots of fish. The area is strewn with big granite boulders, stacked one on top of the other, with big holes, ledges and swim throughs. In the rocky holes are a large variety of sponge and soft coral life. Known for its significant colony of Leafy Sea Dragons, we have also had a recent hatching of Weedy Sea Dragons.  Entry is via either the sandy beach named Chamber’s Beach, rocky breakwater or a small jetty ladder. 

Screw Pile Jetty
 
Location: Fleurieu Peninsula, 1 hour south of Adelaide
 
Depth: 6-10 meters
 
Rating: Open Water
 
Victor Harbour is home to one of South Australia’s most famous underwater attractions, the leafy sea dragon, this area and the jetty has some really interesting marine life. One of the most popular attractions at Victor Harbour is Granite Island, which is situated just offshore in Encounter Bay. The historic Causeway links the island to the mainland; you can either walk across of catch a ride on a horse-drawn tram. Rock wallabies and little penguins can be seen on the island, and sometimes, dramatic sea spray, as massive swells crash into the island. Finished in 1882, the Screw Pile jetty located at the north-eastern end of the tram tracks and breakwater expanded Victor Harbour’s capacity as a deep sea port. The iron piles were screwed into the limestone seabed and now provide home for a wide range of marine life.

Old Iron Ore Jetty, Whyalla
 
Location: Eyre Peninsula, 5 hours west of Adelaide
 
Depth: 4-6 meters
 
Rating: Open Water
 
Entering from the north beach next to the yacht club, a surface swim may be required to the yellow foul ground marker. Make your decent there to approximately 4 meters. You’ll see a channel that drops down to around 11 meters at the end of the jetty with a large pile of bulldozer debris, including several of the old pylons and other materials from the jetty. If you head south from there along the slope you will find another 3 large debris piles. Fish life includes cuttlefish, seahorses, pipefish, and a range of crabs, nudibranchs and a variety of other fish species. It’s a great night dive as well. Resident dolphins are common visitors enjoying playful games swimming amongst divers. 

Wallaroo Jetty
 
Location: Yorke Peninsula, 1.5 hours northwest of Adelaide
 
Depth: 6-18 meters
 
Rating: Open Water
 
The jetty provides some great diving with historic structure and construction materials laying on the bottom, now an established reef system. The jetty was the third jetty to be built in Wallaroo and was opened in 1927. In areas near the end of the jetty you will find depths of up to 18 meters depending on the tides. In shore depths are at an average of 6-10 meters particularly in and around the T section. The timber pylons have abundant varieties of sponges and hard corals covering their surface. The jetty is home to a diverse range of marine life including frog fish, ornate cow fish, leather jackets, sting rays, port Jackson sharks and schooling pelagic. It is highly recommended that your first dive here is done with and experienced diver who knows the site. Caution note: Be aware of the fishing line in and around the pylons due to high popularity with recreational fishers. The visibility can be heavily impacted when large ships are docked unloading grain.

Port Hughes Jetty
 
Location: Yorke Peninsula, 1.5 hours north west of Adelaide
 
Depth: 6-10 meters
 
Rating: Open Water
 
As South Australia’s premier macro dive site, port Hughes offers a huge variety of unique marine life including abundant frog fish, prow fish, angler fish, nudibranchs, shrimps, crabs, pygmy cuttlefish, dumpling squid and seahorses just to name a few. On the average dive large schools of mackerel and old wives swim through the jetty pylons which are covered with soft and hard coral and sponges. This site is popular with local underwater photographers and divers keen to see something different. Access to the site is via a stairway direct to the water’s surface; with an average depth of 6 meters the site is great for long bottom times. 

Port Victoria Jetty
 
Location: Yorke Peninsula, 2 hours west of Adelaide
 
Depth: 6-10 meters
 
Rating: Open Water
 
Port Victoria jetty is small but very pretty and is worth a look if you’re in the area, or if the weather on the eastern side of the peninsula is poor. Venturing out into the sea grass will often reward you with leafy sea dragon sightings. Maximum depth is around 6 meters. Entry/exit is via the stairs on the jetty. Good parking and toilet and shower facilities are available. Port Victoria town has food and accommodation. Closest air fills are available in Edithburgh.

Point Turton
 
Location: Yorke Peninsula, 3 hours west of Adelaide
 
Depth: 4-6 meters
 
Rating: Point Turton is a relatively shallow dive, a maximum depth of 4-5 meters is generally found. The jetty itself is quite small, with lots of juvenile fish making it their home. The dive is best when extended in the whole bay, with some abalone and crayfish found amongst the rocks to the left of the jetty. Around the bay you’ll find a soft sandy bottom with lots of sea grass meadows that offer shelter to small port Jackson sharks and stingrays the visit the area. 

Stenhouse Bay Jetty
 
Location: Yorke Peninsula, 4 hours west of Adelaide
 
Depth: 6-8 meters
 
Rating: Open Water
 
This is a lovely dive in approximately 10 meters of water located in the southern parts of the Yorke Peninsula. There is amazing life on the numerous pylons on this old wooden jetty providing home to many species of fish. The dive can be a shore dive and/or a boat dive with boat access from the Marion bay boat ramp.

Edithburgh Jetty
 
Location: Yorke Peninsula, 3 hours west of Adelaide
 
Depth: 6-10 meters
 
Rating: Open Water
 
This site has been voted as one of the best dive sites within Australia. Edithburgh is home to a remarkable amount of marine life. On most dives you will find many species of nudibranchs and an abundance of seahorses calling the site their home. The pylons are covered with sponges and soft corals while large congregations of fish are often found around the structure. An average dive will consist of many cuttlefish, frog fish, eels, crabs, shrimp, octopus, dumpling squid, leafy sea dragons, seahorses, port Jackson sharks and small cat sharks are sometimes seen as well. Access to the site is simple with stairs on both sides of the jetty leading to the water’s surface. The depths for Edithburgh vary between 3-4 meters to around 8-10 meters towards the end of the jetty in the north eastern channel. Airfils are available from the service station. 

Port Giles Jetty
 
Location: Yorke Peninsula, 3 hours west of Adelaide
 
Depth: 6-15 meters
 
Rating: Open Water
 
Port Giles jetty lies between Edithburgh and Wool Bay jetties. It’s a long walk down a hill from the car park. A trolley is highly recommended. Entry and exit via stairs right to the water’s surface. Depth is approximately 15 meters towards the end of the jetty. Closest facilities are in Coobowie or Edithburgh and air fills at Edithburgh motors. Please check with Flinders Ports, prior to diving to ensure there is no shipping traffic in port or docking.

Klein’s Point
 
Location: Yorke Peninsula, 3 hours west of Adelaide
 
Depth: 5-10 meters
 
Rating: Open Water
 
Diving is only possible during operation hours of the mine and when the ship Accolade II is not in. Check out the, Flinders Ports, website for access times. Entry is either from the beach next to the carpark (150 meter swim to jetty) or by giant stride from the jetty (3-4 meter drop). Exit is via vertical ladder in the jetty or by the beach. 

Wool Bay Jetty
 
Location: Yorke Peninsula, 3 hours west of Adelaide
 
Depth: 2-6 meters
 
Rating: Open Water
 
Another dive site worth doing on a tour of the peninsula, approximately 3 hours from Adelaide. Wool bay offers relatively shallow diving amongst sea grass and intertidal rocky reef, with an average depth of 3 meters the site is ideal for the novice diver but any level of dive will appreciate the level of marine life on offer in the shallows. Wool Bay has been regarded as one of the best sites to locate the elusive leafy sea dragon and has also proven a popular site for frog fish. Access is simple via timber steps into the water and makes a superb dive when visiting the region.
 
Ardrossan Jetty
 
Location: Yorke Peninsula, 1.5 hours north west of Adelaide
 
Depth: 4-8 meters
 
Rating: Open Water
 
Originally built in 1877 and upgraded in 1998 the Ardrossan jetty, located on the eastern facing shoreline of the northern Yorke Peninsula, is a total of 433 meters in length. Access to the water is via stairway at the end of the jetty which enters the water at the start of the best area of the dive site. The bottom composition under and around the jetty is a combination of seagrass meadows and rocky reef. Key features of the site are the numerous timber pylons making the main superstructure, an abundance of soft sponges and corals make these their home whilst providing shelter for a large number of marine species including nudibranchs, shrimps, crabs and frog fish. In amongst the rocky reef dumpling squid, carpet sharks, old wives, blennies, octopus and cuttlefish are often found.